30 January | Sacred Readings v1

VI. THE PASSING OF ÓGUN.
And in that cry King Ógun heard the doom…
And wearily
He spoke his last sad words: “My boyhood scarce
Had ended on Arámfè’s happy hills
When I came here with Odudúwa; with him,
Lovingly I watched this ancient city growing,
And planted the grand forests for a robe
For queenly Ífè. I have grown old with Ífè:
Sometimes I feel that Ógun did become
Ífè, and Ífè Ógun, with the still lapse
Of years. Yet she rejects me. Ah! my trees
Would be more kind, and to my trees I go.”

Myths of Ífè


Book 3, II

The hanging down of grapes, the brow of a lion, the froth of a foaming wild boar, and many other like things, though by themselves considered, they are far from any beauty, yet because they happen naturally, they both are comely, and delightful; so that if a man shall with a profound mind and apprehension, consider all things in the world, even among all those things which are but mere accessories and natural appendices as it were, there will scarce appear anything unto him, wherein he will not find matter of pleasure and delight.

So will he behold with as much pleasure the true rictus of wild beasts, as those which by skillful painters and other artificers are imitated. So will he be able to perceive the proper ripeness and beauty of old age, whether in man or woman: and whatsoever else it is that is beautiful and alluring in whatsoever is, with chaste and continent eyes he will soon find out and discern.

Those and many other things will he discern, not credible unto every one, but unto them only who are truly and familiarly acquainted, both with nature itself, and all natural things.

Meditations by Marcus Aurelius


Love of truth shows itself in this, that a man knows how to find and value the good in everything.

John Ruskin